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    Putting Your Creativity to Use


    2007 - 02.16

    Cross-posted from MySpace:

    So what does your favorite New York Times bestselling author do for Valentines Day? Kevin was planning to take me to Glenwood Hotsprings for a romantic day of soaking and talking.

    Unfortunately, the day turned out snowy and only 20° F, and we decided that a 3-hour drive followed by a run through below-freezing temperatures to get soggy was, perhaps, not the most conducive to romance. So the ever-creative KevMeister improvised.

    Kevin made me heart-shaped fresh-blueberry scones with clotted cream for breakfast. After giving me a ginormous mushy card, he lit a fire and we watched movies and shows together that he let me pick out. For supper, he fixed me what we call a Love Feast: a variety of cheeses and fruits, crudites, caviar on crackers (garnished with hardboiled eggs, onions, sour cream, and capers), and bread dipped in olive oil, with grapes, stilton cheese, and chocolate for dessert. Not too filling, and very romantic. It was a lovely evening.

    Although this isn’t exactly a blog on writing, it illustrates that creative gifts need not be reserved purely for work — whether your gift is art, writing, cooking, acting, entrepreneurship, dancing, etc. Your creativity should also be used in generous portions to remind those you love of how important they are to you.

    To all of you who are our friends, readers, family, students, fans, or new acquaintances, thank you. May you be surrounded by your loved ones and wonderful books.

    ciao* & hugs,

    Rebecca

    *This multipurpose Italian salutation is used in an advised, tongue-in-cheek manner and in no way implies a corresponding chicness, shallowness, or worldliness on the part of the author. (Additional pejoratives may apply. Void where prohibited by law. Ask your physician if Ciao is right for you.)

    Piled Higher and Deeper


    2007 - 01.08

    Cross-posted from MySpace:

    Have you been watching the most recent installments of Colorado Hogs the Headlines? Three blizzards in three weeks. In our area, the annual average snowfall is roughly 37″. In the past *3 weeks* we’ve had 48″ or so. As if that’s not enough, Denver got a football player killed, and the road to Winter Park had a rip-roaring avalanche. (This isn’t actually our snowy season, BTW. That comes in March and April.) And guess what’s headed our way in a few days?

    Right. More snow.

    Keep an eye on Kevin’s blog for the next week and a half. He’ll be posting his world-famous advice on increasing your writing productivity. Hmm. I doubt that’s enough to get us into the news. What *will* we do next to grab the headlines?

    ciao,*

    Rebecca

    *This multipurpose Italian salutation is used in an advised, tongue-in-cheek manner and in no way implies a corresponding chicness, shallowness, or worldliness on the part of the author. (Additional pejoratives may apply. Void where prohibited by law. Ask your physician if Ciao is right for you.)

    Blizzard Redux and Belated News


    2006 - 12.27

    Cross-posted from MySpace:

    The blizzard just before Christmas meant that the flights of my sister in Maryland, nephew-in-law in Atlanta, sister-in-law in L.A., and brother and family in Seattle all got cancelled. We got whomped by about two feet of snow, so no flights were going in or out. Our cars could’t even make it to the street, much less to pick up family. My niece Sarah and goddaughter Maren were already here and staying with my parents, so Kevin and I snow-shoed two miles to spend time with them (and my parents, sister Diane, brother-in-law Tim, and nephew Spencer) in spite of the weather.

    In what was virtually a Christmas miracle, all but my nephew-in-law managed either to drive here or get one of the rare seats on a rebooked flight and arrive by the 23rd. We had two of the out of town families stay with us, and two extra families and lots of kids stayed at my Mom & Dad’s. As usual, our street was the very last to be plowed, so for days, we had to hike back and forth through knee-deep snow to one of the plowed roads, and have Tim ferry us to and from my parents’ house for family events. Even so, we had a wonderful time, and thank you to so many of you for your kind wishes.

    In addition, just before Christmas I was asked to be a judge for the Writers of the Future Contest. (The KevMeister and I have been giving talks at the annual WotF workshops for about a decade now, but only KJ was an official judge.) Yay!

    I wish you all safety and happiness as a new winter storm approaches Colorado. Proof once more that we’ll do *anything* to get into the news. . . .

    ciao,*

    Rebecca

    *This multipurpose Italian salutation is used in an advised, tongue-in-cheek manner and in no way implies a corresponding chicness, shallowness, or worldliness on the part of the author. (Additional pejoratives may apply. Void where prohibited by law. Ask your physician if Ciao is right for you.)

    The Colorado Theory


    2006 - 11.05

    Cross-posted from MySpace:


    Current mood:  exhausted
    Category: Life

    My apologies to those of you waiting for another writing blog. I’m still up to my eyeballs on the Sandworms edit. Just a few more days. Honest.

    Meanwhile, I thought I’d share with you a theory Kevin and I came up with years ago after moving to our castle in Colorado. The theory is this:

    Colorado will do anything — absolutely anything — to get into the news.

    That’s right, whatever it takes: High school shootings, child beauty queen murders, the latest bon mot from Focus on the Family’s James Dobson, forest fires, blizzards . . . The list goes on and on. Really. For a modestly sized state, we get waaaay more than our share of press. Religious scandal, anyone? Yup Ted Haggard’s local to Colorado Springs. Makes a lowly writer proud.

    Hey, it’s home.

    ciao,*

    Rebecca

    *This multipurpose Italian salutation is used in an advised, tongue-in-cheek manner and in no way implies a corresponding chicness, shallowness, or worldliness on the part of the author. (Additional pejoratives may apply. Void where prohibited by law. Ask your physician if Ciao is right for you.)

    What’s in a Name?


    2006 - 09.24

    Cross-posted from MySpace:

    My view of Manners 101 indicates that, if only to be polite, people should make an attempt to pronounce a name the way its owner does. You ask for guidance once or twice, then you say it correctly from then on, right? How hard could that be, really? Pretty tough, if experience is anything to go by.

    I long ago got over the idea that people would pronounce my name correctly. Lost cause. Seriously. Some of my best friends still have no clue after a decade or more, bless ’em.

    What’s that? Well, since you asked, my name’s pronounced MESS-tuh (like ‘messed up’ without the ‘p’). If you can’t remember, I won’t hold it against you, just as I don’t hold a grudge against any of my friends for it. There’s no point. Life is full of things to get righteously angry about, and mispronouncing my name isn’t one of them.

    But I do allow myself to get *annoyed* about this: although Jo Rowling is closing in on a decade of being one of the most celebrated names in the history of publishing, that name is butchered in the media on an hourly (or perhaps minute-ly) basis. This is both rude and completely unnecessary.

    Go onto jkrowling.com, click on Biography, and read. Right in her official bio, she says this:
    ‘Rowling’ (the first syllable of which is pronounced ‘row’ as in boat, rather than ‘row’ as in argument) lent itself to woeful jokes such as ‘Rowling stone’, ‘Rowling pin’ and so on.

    With this information available right on the author’s web page, every news anchor, talk show host, librarian, book seller, conventioneer, and fan should get it right.

    Right? No excuses, now!

    Please join me in my campaign to show a little respect for the woman who has given us so much reading pleasure. I think she’s earned it. Keep rolling, Jo. We’re waiting for that seventh book.

    ciao,*

    Rebecca

    *This multipurpose Italian salutation is used in an advised, tongue-in-cheek manner and in no way implies a corresponding chicness, shallowness, or worldliness on the part of the author. (Additional pejoratives may apply. Void where prohibited by law. Ask your physician if Ciao is right for you.)